A Proper Sonet, Wherein a Louer Dolefully Sheweth his Grief to his L. and Requireth Pity

This is a song I’ve had in my songbook for a few years now. I spent quite a lot of time researching it and its tune, as (at the time) I had a fair amount of trouble finding ‘Row Well Ye Mariners’ online. I eventually settled for learning the tune off a wav file that played at incredible speeds.

The tune is fairly complex and took me a while to get down. I physically can’t sing the song any faster than I’ve sung it here – my tounge gets tied and trips over itself. It’s lyrics also indicate that it’s been written for a male vocalist, so my mezzo-soprano vocals are at odds with the intended outcome.

Online, you can find the transcript (along with other pretties) here: http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/ballads/handful.html, and a copy of an 1878 print here: https://archive.org/stream/handfulofpleasan00robiuoft#page/20/mode/2up.

The Spirit of Lochac

I’ve entered Known World’s Got Talent. So give the video a thumbs up and help me climb the ranks.

Breadth challenge #27: flat woven bracelet

I was bumbling around on youtube a few months ago and I saw a post on weaving bracelets.  I think I may have been looking for Viking Wire Weaving techniques, but that’s not what this was.  This was a true weave, very simple and relaxed, and very quick, it looked, to make.  

Last night I decided to actually try it.

The basic techniques is this- you take however many short strands you want your bracelet to have (for the width of the bracelet) and one extra long one (I just left the wire on the spool) and put them all lined up, long ends out, in a vice grip, with the extra long strand at the end.  Fold the wires down alternating forward and back, then bring the long strand over. Tamp it down, say with a block of wood hit with a hammer, or something similar.  I think if your wire is coated with something, say a laquer or a coloured coating, don’t use the hammer on bare metal, as you may end up destroying  your coatingthen go back and repeat the process.  Fold your strands, lift your long strand over, tamp it down, repeat.  Every so often you’re going to want to drop it down into your vice so it sits flush, I recommend every couple of weaves  just to be safe, otherwise your bracelet will bunch up on itself.  Once you’ve got it to the right length, stop.  I wasn’t so sure about finishing off, so I clipped all the tail ends fairly short, pushed them down into place, and covered the ends with my clasps, which were basically done with wire wrapping, much the same as all other jewellery I make.

Unfortunately, I am unsure how to add a photo of my finished product into this post, as I’m using an iPad with my wordpress account for the first time.  I’ll try to get the photo uploaded sometime in the next 24 hours.

Breadth Challenge #26: Mittens!

I have, for the past couple of weeks, been recuperating from hand surgery.  I can’t do a hell of a lot with my right hand right now due to a lack of mobility, after stitches and a week in plaster left me with a stiff wrist.  Wanting to make sure I developed precision in my fingers once again, I’ve been reprising the stitch I mentioned in the last post (which has now been identified as buttonhole stitch), and have a variation which I’m currently looking up.  Sorry, guys, no process photos this time, but perhaps with my next post (which should be socks)

So I got through the first mitten, and started thinking about the way I attached the thumbs.  I grew up with integrated thumbs on gloves, so it seemed like the most natural way of attaching them, but as I worked the mittens directly off my hands rather than any researched pattern, I really don’t know.  I think I’ll be going on a research binge over the next couple of days, because I really want to know now.

 

Breadth Challenge #25: A wee little baggie!

It’s some sort of strange thing, I always seem to end up making pouches/bags/other things-to-contain-stuff-in, etc., as my first piece of anything textile related.  And so it is in this case.

I’m not sure what the technique I used is called.  I came upon it in a dream, as many of my varied ideas do.  At first I was convinced it was a type of naalbinding.  Then, after reading up some more on naalbinding, my certainty wavered, even though it shares many hallmarks of said technique.  Having only attempted naalbinding once, and remembering only a mass of tangles from the attempt, all I can do is show what I have done and let other, more knowledgeable people work out what I’ve accomplished.

Starting position

Start by taking your piece of wool and wrapping it around your finger.  Add a half twist as shown.

Second step

Next, you want to run your long end under the loop on your finger, but over the long trailing end of your wool, as shown.

Pull the loop snug

This should make a single loop, which you should pull nice and snug.

A run of loops

Continue a run of loops, going under the finger loop and over the long length of wool, roughly 7 or 8 times.

Making your starting circle

Slip the loop off your finger.  Pulling on the short piece of wool that you originally started with will pull the loops into a circle.  From here on in, you will be forming a spiral.

Stitch into each progressive loop

Instead of stitching directly onto the finger loop, you’ll now be stitching into each of the loops you’ve already made.  To expand in a circle, add a second stitch to each second loop.  To make a tube, make only one stitch for each loop.

My stripes were made simply by alternating the colour of the wool I used, as this is a technique that requires you use short lengths.  I found any length longer than my arm span was too difficult to manage.

A quick eye will notice that I’ve added eyelets.  I thought for quite some time on how to do this.  In the end, I worked each one by skipping 4 loops, then stitching 4, then skipping four, etc., whilst only pulling the running thread tight enough to span the length of the four skipped loops.  When the spiral reached the skipped parts, I continued to loop onto the straight piece of thread as if it were the original finger loop, for four loops, then stitching normally for four loops, etc.

The drawstring is a simple four strand braid, as I covered here.

The resulting fabric is thick, springy and stiff.  It feels fabulously durable.  Note in the first picture that the bag (which is empty) is standing unaided, which should give an indication how stiff this fabric is.

If anyone knows if this is naalbinding or some other form of textile, please let me know, as I’d like to be able to put a name to what I’m doing.

Breadth Challenge #24: Trichinopoly

So, something new for my breadth challenge.  I first saw trichinopoly last year at Rowany where, alas, I only saw about 2 minutes of the tutorial on said subject, and that two minutes was without any form of comprehension as I was just waiting for my next collegia to start in the adjacent tent.  I’ve been wanting to try it ever since, but haven’t had any idea how to start.

For those who are left completely at sea by the five syllable word that sounds like a prehistoric sea creature or something, trichinopoly is also known as Viking or Norse wire weaving, or Viking chain knit.

Yesterday, I came across the Viking Knit tutorial on the Tangible Daydreams blog.  I immediately set to trying it, but ended in a puddle of disappointment and horrendous knots.  Knowing that it was my understanding that was at fault rather than the tutorial, I set out to find similar tutorials that put things into slightly different formats.  A couple of searches later, I found this tutorial.  The two tutorials together got me knitting in no time.

I am rather proud of myself for going the extra step and using my man’s drill press, which I am somewhat terrified of, to drill myself a drawplate.  Eight different gauges of drill bit gave me eight successive holes to draw down, and produced a very even finish.

Alas, my camera is pretty much dead, however I’ve managed to snag some photos with my i-Pad.  Sadly, the quality is bad, but you’ll get the idea.

Weaving in action

Necklace once it's been drawn through the drawplate

My only hassle has been with the clasps at the ends.  This, I think, will require some practice.

A last note:  In one of the tutorial links the writer made a note about the chain becoming two times longer.  This is not necessarily accurate.  I stopped my knit at 15cm, expecting a choker sized length.  Instead, my completed length of chain is 55cm.

 

 

Check out this site!

If you’ve at all found my site to be of interest, there’s another site you may well find to be just as informative:  http://tangibledaydreams.blogspot.com/

I was looking for bits and pieces SCA related, and this blog happened across my radar, and has now been bookmarked.  So far I’ve looked through felting, trichinopoly, slippers, hat making, and I’m only just scratching the surface.

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